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LAST UPDATED AT 25/03/2015 AT 16:57

Bookshelves

Shakespeare and Company



Shakespeare and Company’s bookshelves

LAST UPDATED AT 13/01/2016 AT 17:02

Bookshelves

Andrew Miller's bookshelf

16th January 2015


This bookshelf is for when you're feeling slightly under the weather i.e not feeling so ill you must close the curtains, shut your eyes and wait for the doctor, but a little indisposed, or perhaps convalescing and needing no great shocks to the system, but also needing somehow to fill up on what is good.

Browse more authors' bookshelves:
• Keri Walsh on Sylvia's Circle
• John Baxter on A Sweet Sickness
• Max Porter on Sending Grief on Holiday
• Joanna Walsh on Her 8 Best Books of 2015


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 27/03/2015 AT 15:34

Bookshelves

Books that will put a Spring in your Step

19th March 2015


Get in trouble, eat delicious food, go for a run, stay alive, read books, buy (more) shoes, be a happy reader, embrace life, spring has sprung!


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 27/03/2015 AT 15:34

Bookshelves

Happy St Patrick's Day

23rd March 2015


When Irish eyes are smiling it is often because they are reading one of these terrific books. It could also be because some banker has finally got his comeuppance in a tribunal, but for now, let's just celebrate Irish literature in some of its many forms.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 25/03/2015 AT 16:54

Bookshelves

David Bowie Is...

25th March 2015


We like to think we float in our own peculiar way here at the bookshop and being big Bowie fans, we are thrilled that the extraordinary exhibition, David Bowie Is, has finally come to Paris. So take your protein pills and enjoy our literary tribute to our favourite space oddity.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 27/03/2015 AT 15:34

Bookshelves

Find the love of your life

27th March 2015


Rebecca Solnit wrote that, "writing is saying to no one and to everyone the things it is not possible to say to someone." Books make perfect Valentine gifts, eloquently portraying feelings we cannot always articulate ourselves. Here we have let our selection of books speak for themselves, click on each book for a beautiful quote, and fall in love with books all over again.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 03/04/2015 AT 10:32

Bookshelves

Happy Easter!

3rd April 2015


Follow us down the rabbit hole this Easter. Forget about hunting for eggs, or parading about in a new bonnet, hunt down a new book at your local bookshop and enjoy the read.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 14/04/2015 AT 11:25

Bookshelves

2015 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize shortlist

14th April 2015


International literary giants Haruki Murakami and Erwin Mortier have made the shortlist for the 2015 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, the 25th anniversary of the Prize. They are joined by German authors Jenny Erpenbeck and Daniel Kehlmann, as well as the Prize's first shortlisted book from Equatorial Guinea, courtesy of Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel. They are joined on the list by Colombian Tomás González.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 15/04/2015 AT 15:52

Bookshelves

Sylvia's Circle by Keri Walsh

15th April 2015


First, there are the Sylvia Beach essentials: Ernest Hemingway's A Moveable Feast, Noel Riley Fitch's Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation, Richard Ellmann's James Joyce, Gertrude Stein's Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, and Sylvia's own writings (her memoir Shakespeare and Company and her collected letters). Once you've read those, you can move on to these gems, all written by her friends and associates. A few notes on this list: If you have a modernist turn of mind and haven't had the pleasure of discovering it yet, Walter Benjamin's book on Charles Baudelaire, The Writer of Modern Life, is a once-in-a-lifetime treasure (and the perfect gateway to Benjamin's Arcades Project). Samuel Beckett's poems feature his dazzling translations of French poetry; and the City Lights “Corrected Centenary edition” of Stein's Tender Buttons is pleasing to hold and to read. Richard Wright, Paul Robeson, and H.D. were among the Americans whose careers Sylvia promoted in Paris.

Keri Walsh is the editor of The Letters of Sylvia Beach​. Sylvia Beach was the first publisher of James Joyce’s Ulysses in 1922 and the owner of the original Shakespeare and Company bookstore in Paris. Professor Walsh teaches in the Department of English at Fordham University in the Bronx, New York. When her students travel to Paris, she advises them to make two pilgrimages: one to Oscar Wilde's grave, and the other to Shakespeare and Company. Her edition of James Joyce’s Dubliners is forthcoming from Broadview Press.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 23/04/2015 AT 09:04

Bookshelves

Happy Birthday, William Shakespeare!

23rd April 2015


This week we celebrate the life of our namesake, William Shakespeare, whose birthday falls in April.
"Knowing I lov'd my books, he furnish'd me from mine own library with volumes that I prize above my dukedom." — William Shakespeare


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 05/05/2015 AT 09:35

Bookshelves

Les Tudors at the Musée du Luxembourg, 18 March - 19 July 2015

5th May 2015


Of all the dynasties that have succeeded one another on the English throne, the Tudors, who reigned between 1485 and 1603, are one of the most popular. Brush up on your history with some of these fascinating reads before checking out this exhibition which is the first in France on the subject.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 20/05/2015 AT 14:53

Bookshelves

Books on Screen

20th May 2015


Can't make it to Cannes? Curl up in your armchair with a book and a bowl of popcorn. Or you could watch a movie. But books last longer. Make a lot of popcorn.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 04/06/2015 AT 14:16

Bookshelves

Churchill - De Gaulle Exhibition at the Musée de l'Armée

4th June 2015


2015 will be the year of a double commemoration, the 70th Anniversary of the end of the Second World War and the 50th Anniversary of Churchill's death. From 10th April to 26th July 2015, the Musée de l'Armée and the Fondation Charles de Gaulle present a joint exhibition, Churchill-De Gaulle, inspired by the tragic events that led to their encounter. If you want to delve further into this topic, try one of the following books.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 04/06/2015 AT 15:02

Bookshelves

A Sweet Sickness by John Baxter

4th June 2015


Book collecting has been called “a sweet sickness.” Its symptoms include a hunger that only the aroma of paper and the feel of a fine binding can satisfy. This selection of modestly-priced first editions from Shakespeare and Company’s Rare Book Room raises the curtain on the treasures that, for half a century, have made it a Mecca for collectors. But enter at your peril. The bibliophile bug, once caught, can make one, like me, its slave for life.

An expat resident of Paris for more than twenty years, John Baxter is the author of the bestselling memoirs Five Nights in Paris, The Perfect Meal, The Most Beautiful Walk in the World, Immoveable Feast: A Paris Christmas, Paris at the End of the World, and We’ll Always Have Paris. He is the co-director of the Paris Writers Workshop and gives walking tours through Paris. John Baxter lives with his wife and daughter, in the same building Sylvia Beach called home.

See photos and listen to the podcast of John’s brilliant recent event for Five Nights in Paris.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 29/06/2015 AT 13:28

Bookshelves

Festival d'Avignon from 4th to 26th of July 2015

29th June 2015


The Avignon Festival is one of the most important performing arts events in the world. It takes place every summer in July in the courtyard of the Popes' Palace as well as in other locations around the city of Avignon. Get a flavour of this year's events with some of the following books.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 13/07/2015 AT 13:36

Bookshelves

Stories from the American South

13th July 2015


Sit on your verandah with a mint julep in one hand, a classic of the American South in the other and raise a glass to the publication of Harper Lee's surprise second novel, Go Set A Watchman.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 23/07/2015 AT 12:32

Bookshelves

2015 Summer Reads

17th July 2015


A good book is as important an item in your suitcase as sunscreen, mosquito repellent, plug converters and other such holiday prerequisites, in fact, I'm going to go the distance and say that it is probably even more important, more essential to your enjoyment of your holiday than any of those potenially life-saving items. Whether you're looking for heartbreak or humour, mysteries or mayhem, there's something in the following list for anyone looking for a captivating read this summer.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 29/07/2015 AT 11:01

Bookshelves

From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk: Jean-Paul Gaultier & French Fashion

29th July 2015


From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, the Jean-Paul Gaultier exhibition currently showing at Grand Palais, features astonishing haute couture and prêt‐à‐porter ensembles designed between 1970 and 2013. If you can't handle the queues but want to immerse yourself in the world of French fashion, stroll on over to your local bookshop and take a look at one of the following.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 17/08/2015 AT 13:33

Bookshelves

Not the Booker shortlist 2015

17th August 2015


Every year Sam Jordison leads a hunt by readers of the Guardian books blog to find the year's best book, which may – or may not – tally with the assessment of the Man Booker prize judges. The winning book will be announced on 12 October 2015. The prize? A Guardian mug.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 20/08/2015 AT 08:27

Bookshelves

Sending Grief on Holiday by Max Porter

20th August 2015


If I had to send my novella, Grief is the Thing with Feathers, on holiday, then I’d pack these books in its suitcase. They are books which speak of similar concerns. Some of them are directly related to the subject matter; mourning, childhood and poetic obsession. Some of them are by the writers I think of as my permission givers, writers who do things with language and form that have moved or shocked or inspired me. Some of them are books I have loved and returned to many times, such as Angry Arthur, which I consider to be a book of complete perfection. They are all books I would want with me in my shack in the woods, when that time comes. From Hughes’ letter to his son Nicholas explaining his decision to publish Birthday Letters, to the exquisite dismantling of language in Anne Carson’s Nox, these are books which changed the way I think. If anything gathers them all together, from the deep peace and rural quiet of late John McGahern, to the roaring dream-time brilliance of Riddley Walker, it is that these are books which celebrate language. Books which lodge themselves in a reader’s brain and refuse to leave.

Max Porter is a senior editor at Granta Books and Portobello Books. He previously managed an independent bookshop and won the Young Bookseller of the Year award. He lives in South London with his wife and children. Grief is the Thing with Feathers is his first book.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 27/08/2015 AT 08:10

Bookshelves

Turning Up the Heat

27th August 2015


There's long been a creative connection between extreme weather and extreme behaviour. In these books, the sun bakes down, steamy indolent summers linger on, and the weather becomes a force and a character in its own right, unleashing all sorts of strange and wild occurrences.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 16/09/2015 AT 15:30

Bookshelves

Booker Shortlist 2015

16th September 2015


Marlon James, Tom McCarthy, Chigozie Obioma, Sunjeev Sahota, Anne Tyler and Hanya Yanagihara are announced as the shortlisted authors for the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 16/09/2015 AT 15:50

Bookshelves

La Rentrée 2015

16th September 2015


Autumn is always an exciting time for new fiction and an exciting time generally if you're someone who doesn't like blistering summer temperatures. Put on your favourite scarf and curl up with one of our la Rentrée selection.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 01/10/2015 AT 10:55

Bookshelves

Shakespeare and Coffee

1st October 2015


Don't drink coffee elsewhere, drink it at the new Shakespeare and Company café opening this autumn. Read a book while you're at it.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 22/10/2015 AT 07:59

Bookshelves

New Children's Section

21st October 2015


Oh, the books you can read,
You can read about the tiger, and when he came to tea,
You can read about the rabbit, the one made from velveteen,
You can read about Charlotte and her web, oh so wide,
A book is just perfect when you're in the mood to hide,
Oh, the books you can read!


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 04/11/2015 AT 16:29

Bookshelves

My 8 best books of 2015 by Joanna Walsh

4th November 2015


When two of my books (Vertigo and Hotel) were published within a week of each other in the US, I dealt with the terror by trying to build some new book shelves. My books were overflowing from my current shelves onto the floor, pooling under my bed, around the legs of furniture, growing into stacks of must-reads, stacks of should-reads, stacks of probably-won’t-reads, stacks to-give-away and many other subdivisions. Not able to carpenter, or to afford readymades, I bought some scaffolding planks that I was surprised to find as thick and heavy as young trees. They lay across the floor of my workroom for a long time, which made it difficult to get to and from my desk until I got hold of some bricks to stack between them. Now they hold almost all my books.

These are the books published in 2015 that I was happiest to add to my shelves.

Joanna Walsh's books include Hotel, Vertigo, and Fractals. Her writing has also been published by The Dalkey Archive (Best European Fiction 2015), Granta Magazine, Salt (Best British Short Stories, 2014 and 2015), The Stinging Fly, Gorse, and others. She reviews for the Guardian, The New Statesman, and The National. She is fiction editor at 3:AM Magazine, and runs @read_women, described by The New York Times as “a rallying cry for equal treatment for women writers”.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 06/11/2015 AT 13:10

Bookshelves

Warhol Unlimited

6th November 2015


Comprising over 200 works, Unlimited, the Andy Warhol exhibition at the Musée d’Art Moderne, highlights the serial side of the Warhol oeuvre – a crucial aspect of his work – and his ability to rethink the way art should be exhibited. Discover more about one of the leading proponents of pop art with some of the following titles.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 20/11/2015 AT 15:55

Bookshelves

Guardian first book award shortlist 2015

20th November 2015


The Guardian First Book Award celebrates first-time writers across all genres who have had their first book published in English during the last year. This year's shortlist includes poetry, prose-poetry, fiction and non-fiction. A winner will be selected by a judging panel which includes British writer and historian Tom Holland, BBC journalist and newsreader Emily Maitlis and Forward-winning poet Kei Miller. The winner will be announced at an awards ceremony in London on Wednesday 25 November 2015 and will receive a £10,000 prize.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 30/11/2015 AT 10:44

Bookshelves

All I Want for Christmas...

30th November 2015


Last Christmas, I gave you my heart, but the very next day you gave it away, this year, to save me from tears, please give me some books.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 29/12/2015 AT 16:24

Bookshelves

Best Books of 2015

29th December 2015


We called upon our booksellers to tell us their favourite reads of 2015 and this is what they came up with. It’s an eclectic list, which is just as it should be when you ask thirteen voracious readers for their opinions. There are prize-winning novels, unsettling short story collections, works of history, anthropology and philosophy, and a timely, deeply moving essay on race relations. There’s also one little book about a crow that just doesn’t fit any category at all.

Click on any of the titles to read more about why the book was chosen.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 12/01/2016 AT 11:54

Bookshelves

New Books in 2016

12th January 2016


Compiling this list of exciting forthcoming titles really got my heart racing. And this is just a fraction of the fantastic new reads coming our way. Will there be enough time to read them all? How quickly can we get our mitts on them? Which ones will be the ones that no-one can agree on? Shiny new books: pure catnip.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 20/01/2016 AT 15:13

Bookshelves

Carnal Mythology by Yelena Moskovich

19th January 2016


There are people who leave their bodies and their bodies go on living without them. These people are named Natasha.

Here are some other Natashas I have gotten to know, part of a diaspora of voices for whom language is sometimes damage, and damage an aphrodisiac. Where eroticism is called home, and comes home, claiming its own welcome.

From the bone-chilling romance of Russian Ludmilla Petrushevskaya, to the rubix-cube stories of self-consciousness of Spanish Ana Maria Moix in Dangerous Virtues, the poetry “in the quiet vacant dark” of Persian Forugh Farrokhzad, to the provocation to dance from Jamaican Jean ‘Binta’ Breeze: “inside this womb / is the song of songs / the story of all stories / can you move that?”

The masterfully subversive Japanese German-writing Yoko Tawada’s The Naked Eye, following a Vietnamese student smuggled through the Iron Curtain, eventually to Paris where she takes refuge in cinema and her obsession with Catherine Deneuve.

The daring essays on healing our perspectives on love, gender, and sex by the African-American writer and social activist Bell Hooks.

And the Hungarian András Pályi, who transforms the political occupation of territory into carnal mythology, in his two novella collection, Out of Onself. In the second novella, Ildi Schön a young actress in1980s Communist Budapest seeks to reclaim her flesh:

…at the very spot when Gergö almost stabbed Rudi to death, I’m telling you we were sitting here and I was saying to them, kids, do whatever you want to me…but they wouldn’t believe me, so I started to strip, yea, right there, no sweat at all…


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 26/01/2016 AT 16:46

Bookshelves

My Bookish Valentine

26th January 2016


Some people say it with flowers. Others with chocolates. Others by holding aloft a Peter-Gabriel-blasting boombox in their intended’s front garden. We think there’s no better way to say it than with a book - even more so one plucked from our shelves, stamped with our logo and sent from the heart of a city practically synonymous with the Big L. Your choice should be personal, elegant and loaded with double meaning (or double entendre, if you prefer). Should you need a little inspiration our booksellers have selected these few titles to get you started.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 05/02/2016 AT 11:28

Bookshelves

Genre-Benders by Rob Doyle

5th February 2016


In their variously delightful ways, the books I’ve chosen here all melt down the barrier between fiction and non-fiction, and exhilarate through proximity to the lived experience of the author, rather than relying on artifices of character and plot. In my series of linked short stories This Is the Ritual, I took great pleasure in creating fictions that drew inspiration from books such as these. Thus there are essays that are stories (and vice versa), autofictional self-assassinations, and deadpan biographies of imaginary authors - in short, fictions that keep the reader guessing how much is truth and how much is fabrication.

What binds together many of the books I find fascinating is a spirit of playfulness, along with a genre-bending willingness to disregard the conventions of much so-called literary fiction. Summertime by J.M. Coetzee was a novel comprised of (fictitious) interviews with figures from the life of the deceased South African author, J.M. Coetzee. In Sheila Heti’s How Should a Person Be or Aidan Higgins’ Balcony of Europe, the authors novelised their own day-to-day lives rather than dream up stories that never happened. These are all writers whose natural instinct is to make it new, recasting literary forms in their own mould and jettisoning the parts they find boring, rather than merely inheriting the common ways of doing things. As such, they thrill me as a reader and inspire me as a writer.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 18/02/2016 AT 14:00

Bookshelves

short month / short stories

16th February 2016


The days are short, the month is short, tempers are short when you lose yet another umbrella, why not keep the stories short too? Here is a selection of some of our favourites as well as some new collections that we are excited about. All go well with tea and shortbread.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 05/04/2016 AT 15:44

Bookshelves

Claire-Louise Bennett's Bookshelf

5th April 2016


A lot of the time I feel like I’m just hanging around. Seldom is it obvious to me what I should do with myself. Some philosophers and psychologists believe that human beings are born with a number of innate predispositions and it is the fulfilment of these biological and social leanings that give direction and meaning to one’s life. Along with many other instructive and possibly life-saving documents I seem to have mislaid that particular blueprint and am therefore forever grappling with the double-edged sword of freedom; sometimes I feel like a swashbuckling occupant of the whole wide world, other times I cannot muster the wherewithal to tread beyond the apartment door. When I think about the writers I most often orientate towards I am not surprised to realise that the basic situations of life do not occur to them automatically either. They presuppose very little, if anything, and so the use of themselves in the world is persistently unclear to them. They never quite adapt to and integrate with their surroundings, instead they prod about in an obsessive hermetic zone, or else freefall fast and loose through a dissolving universe. Paul Bowles was 17 when he decided to quit America – ‘I think I had a fairly good idea of what life would be like for me in the States, and I didn’t want it.’ When the interviewer asks him what it would have been like, Bowles replies; ‘boring’. Pessoa dodged the obligations of a fixed personality by devising around 70 heteronyms for himself, Sara Maitland left behind the yakkety-yak of city life in order to experience deep silence in the Hebrides, and Beckett went so far as to abandon his mother tongue – ‘Is there any reason why that terrible materiality of the word surface should not be capable of being dissolved?’ he asked.


The dissolution of that which appears to be an essential of life – home, identity, integration, language – can be liberating and may lead to something ground-breaking, personally and artistically, yet it can also be alienating and traumatic: ‘It was as if a curtain had fallen, hiding everything I had ever known’, goes the opening line of Voyage in the Dark; the eighteen year old narrator, having spent her childhood in the West Indies, has just arrived in England. The author Ella Williams came to London from the island of Dominica in 1908, and was renamed Jean Rhys by Ford Maddox Ford some years later, but she never did quite settle into either of these adopted appellations. ‘I would never be part of anything’, she wrote in her unfinished autobiography, ‘I would never really belong anywhere, and I knew it, and all my life would be the same, trying to belong, and failing. Always something would go wrong. I am a stranger and I always will be, and after all I didn’t really care.’ Whether through wilful sabotage, laziness, inattention, or some inherent glitch, I frequently feel slightly at odds with wherever I am and the things that go on there. And so I am grateful for the existence of the books listed here because I have felt very much at home in each one of them. As I am sure you will too, regardless of how well attuned you may or may not be; after all, as Shirley Jackson wisely pointed out – ‘No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.’.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 03/05/2016 AT 15:44

Bookshelves

Existentialist moods by Sarah Bakewell

3rd May 2016


If you’ve read Jean-Paul Sartre’s Nausea or Albert Camus’s The Stranger you’ll know that Paris’s famous existentialists did not just write philosophical treatises: they liked conveying their ideas through stories. Perhaps the best novelist among them was Simone de Beauvoir, whose dramatic She Came to Stay and panoramic The Mandarins revolve around her existentialist notions of political and personal life. Other writers sprinkled existentialist spices into their fiction too, if only through Parisian settings or anguished moods. For existentialists, “mood” is itself a philosophical principle: it is through moods that we perceive and experience the world.

While researching At the Existentialist Café, I became fascinated by this network of influences in fiction, especially when it stretched across the Atlantic. Camus and Sartre modelled their work on earlier hard-boiled American detective fiction by writers like James M. Cain, or Horace McCoy – whose bleak, horrifying They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? gripped me so much that I couldn’t get back to the writing till I’d finished it. Later American writers then returned the favour by writing their own existentialist novels – like Richard Wright’s existentialist take on the black American experience, The Outsider. On the excuse of “doing research”, I came across a few novels so readable and moving that I’ve been urging them on people ever since – novels such as Patricia Highsmith’s Camus-esque The Tremor of Forgery, or Sloan Wilson’s The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, a classic example of the 1950s tale of alienation and authenticity.

Here’s my selection of a few of these, plus some of the more famous existentialist novels and a few that are “in the mood”. For a wilfully perverse take on Liberation-era Paris, try Funeral Rites by Sartre’s friend Jean Genet; for sheer fun, try Mood Indigo by Boris Vian. Embrace the Angst - and enjoy!


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 18/05/2016 AT 13:45

Bookshelves

Ten Beautiful (Queer) Books About Cities by Olivia Laing

18th May 2016


These were the wild books I was reading while I was working on The Lonely City: the books I turned to for guidance or for mood, to conjure up the New York of the past century, the seedy, squalid, beautiful city. These were the books that reported on loss and death and danger, that told me about sex and connection, about art and love amidst the ruins. And these are the books that helped medicate my own loneliness, that taught me isolation is never not political.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 02/06/2016 AT 12:49

Bookshelves

Strindberg & Co by Tumbleweed Hannah

1st June 2016


This bookshelf contains the most famous writers from the cold country up north. There is a book for every reader: short stories for the anxious, supernatural books for youngsters, and literature for the highly updated Swede. Sweden is not only the greatest publisher of murder mysteries, the country is also expert at delivering dark stories about drunken priests, orphan girls living with animals, and novels about men that will never return your calls. Journey through this literate world and find out how the population has been affected by the darkness that we encounter every winter.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 01/09/2016 AT 13:27

Bookshelves

Festival America 2016 - 8th Edition

1st September 2016


The eighth edition of Festival America will be taking place in Vincennes from 8-11 September 2016 and we are delighted that we will once again be on-site in the bookshop marquee to make available all the wonderful books and hopefully meet some of the authors. This is a terrific festival featuring over 60 authors and celebrating the literature of the United States in all its richness and diversity. Come and say hello!


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 24/11/2016 AT 09:56

Bookshelves

Our Favourite Books of 2016

24th November 2016


From the edgiest new fiction to prizewinning memoir, to a scabrous, 800-page solution to the Jack the Ripper mystery, when asked to name the best books they read this year, our booksellers didn’t disappoint.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 03/01/2017 AT 16:40

Bookshelves

Booklovers Love Books on Bookshops

3rd January 2017


Bookstores expand our worlds, indulge our curiosities, answer questions, and excite our imaginations. On the completion of the shop’s own memoirs, Shakespeare and Company, Paris: A History of the Rag & Bone Shop of the Heart, we celebrate independent booksellers around the world—mostly real, a few fictional—along with the loyal, engaged readers who support them.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 06/01/2017 AT 14:07

Bookshelves

New titles Winter / Spring 2017

4th January 2017


With novels from Paul Auster, George Saunders and Sara Baume, as well as timely non-fiction titles by Kapka Kassabova, Mark O'Connell and Emmanuel Carrère, to name but a few, if 2017 is beginning as it means to go on, it looks like we could be in for a vintage year of reading.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 20/01/2017 AT 13:32

Bookshelves

Celebrating Black History Month

20th January 2017


What better time to read groundbreaking literature by black authors than February, Black History Month? The past year or so has seen an incredible new array of award-winning and thought-provoking works. Enjoy this selection of titles from American, Australian and British authors, in a variety of genres from fiction to poetry to memoire. Here you'll find the Man Booker Prize winner, The Sellout, the National Book Award winner, The Underground Railroad, and the book that compelled Oprah to restart her book club, Ruby.

This year's Black History Month feels especially poignant as we say goodbye to America's first black president, Barack Obama, an avid reader himself.

The precise role of the artist, then, is to illuminate that darkness, blaze roads through that vast forest, so that we will not, in all our doing, lose sight of its purpose, which is, after all, to make the world a more human dwelling place. – James Baldwin


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 20/01/2017 AT 14:48

Bookshelves

Happily Ever After

20th January 2017


Literature often has a cruel way with lovers. From Romeo and Juliet to Wide Sargasso Sea, not much goes right for star crossed lovers on the page. But does it have to be this way? Does meeting your one true love inevitably always end in disaster? We say no! This Valentine's Day, we present you a list of our favorite love stories that *spoiler alert* don't end horrifically for all involved. It may not be all Pina Coladas and getting caught in the rain, but at the end of the day these books celebrate pure, true love and all the complications that come with it.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 21/03/2017 AT 14:51

Bookshelves

Short Fiction for Fictive Times by Evan Martinak

21st March 2017


Of the word of the year selections for 2016, Merriam-Webster picked "surreal" and I think this is the correct choice. In French literature writers like André Breton and poet Paul Eluard firmly established themselves as writers of the surrealist tradition which is a category rarely attributed to American or British writers.

Today instead we use the term post-modernism for contemporaries of the French surrealists, a term which everyone agrees was influenced by surrealism, but no one agrees on its official definition. You can see traces of the movement in the writings of Rimbaud, Poe, and some of the old Russian masters, for example Dostoyevsky's richly comic story in which a man is swallowed whole by a crocodile and decides living in its stomach is preferable to the outside world. In 2017, one sympathizes more and more with the man inside the crocodile.


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 23/06/2017 AT 14:54

Bookshelves

Enemies of the People by Sam Jordison

23rd June 2017


I spent a lot of time in weird and ugly corners of the internet while writing Enemies Of The People, but most of the books on this list were also constantly beside me. Many of them provided not only information but wit, righteous anger and new ways of thinking about our problems. Two of them (Atlas Shrugged and Free To Choose) were utter drivel. But they're still important. Everyone should read them. These books have become the foundations of our society. And yet they are ridiculous. The more familiar people become with their ideas, the less power they'll have over us… I hope.

(I also put a PG Wodehouse book on here, because after dealing with these horrors, you may want a reminder that humans can also be wonderful. Leave It To Psmith was the first book I read after I finished writing Enemies Of The People - and it was balm for my soul.)


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 18/09/2017 AT 15:48

Bookshelves

Sagacious by Jonathan Crook

18th September 2017


Vikings! If the image that springs to mind features horned helmets and skull goblets (alas, both fallacies), then reading a few Icelandic sagas will surely change your perception of the Nordic women and men of yore: farmers, shepherds, lawyers, poets, axe-wielding warriors, conquerors of the British Isles and Normandy (literally, "Northmen"), and nautical engineers whose vessels reached North American shores through open ocean and Constantinople via the maze of Eastern European rivers that feed the Black Sea. Rich, curious, and insightful, the Icelandic Sagas offer a fascinating perspective on the Norse Vikings before, during, and after their settlement of the uninhabited island, Iceland.

Whether mythology, history, or poetry, the Icelandic Sagas are a pleasure to read. At the age of six, Egil axed a peer to death for being a more talented athlete. Three years earlier, he rode a horse to a feast that his father had forbidden him from attending–"You [Egil] are difficult enough to cope with when you're sober"–and recited his first poem. These two events offer a glimpse of the sensitive, strong-willed, tempestuous, and poetic Egil Skallagrimsson, whose family is chronicled from its origins in Norway to its settlement in Iceland in Egil's Saga. The Prose Edda lays out an unforgettable mythological framework depicting Yggdrasil, the cosmos envisioned as a great ash tree encompassing the human and godly realms, and Ragnarok, the icy-fiery apocalyptic final battle of the gods after which all life will be extinguished and subsequently re-birthed. Njal's Saga details a ruthless blood feud that neither poetry recitals nor legal cases manage to stop from spiraling wildly out of control. An age-old story that continues to ring true.

Finally, it would be hard to disappoint with The Saga of the Volsungs' hidden treasure, dragon-slaying, and cursed gold ring. Sound familiar to fans of Tolkien?


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 27/10/2017 AT 09:46

Bookshelves

Photobook Week November 7-12, 2017

26th October 2017


From November 7-12, 2017, we're proud to welcome 11 independent English presses, transforming our central display area into a photobook shop during Paris Photo Week.

The aim is to give an insight into the contemporary English photobook scene, and focus on how publishers work with photographers in the production of artist books. Each publisher will present a selection of 5 to 10 recently published titles. The week will also be punctuated by events bringing together authors and their publishers. A selection of the curated titles can be found below.

Read more about the invited publishers on Le Blog.

See the upcoming events
Tuesday 7th November 7pm
Anne Golaz on Corbeau

Thursday 9th November 7pm
Nicholas Muellner on In Most Tides an Island

Friday 10th November 10am
Coffee Morning — Feast for the Eyes: The Story of Food in Photography


ByShakespeare and Company


LAST UPDATED AT 27/11/2017 AT 16:45

Bookshelves

Winter Book Selection

27th November 2017


Gaudy knitted pullovers, roaring log fires and snifters of fine brandy are all very well, but they are for nothing on a winter's evening without a suitably seasonal book to snuggle down with. Thankfully our booksellers have compiled a list of new releases and classic titles perfectly suited to the long December nights.


ByShakespeare and Company